White Papers

SUPS - Sugar Proficiency Scheme

LGC Standards

SUPS is suitable for laboratories who analyse sugar and other natural sweetners, particularly manufactures of sugar and sugar products, soft drink industries, and companies who trade in this soft commodity market.


Download >>

Soft Drinks and Fruit Juices proficiency scheme

LGC Standards

Over the years LGC has gained extensive understanding of the soft drinks and fruit juice industries. Our technical knowledge of laboratory tests required to maintain quality, compositional values and organoleptic properties of beverages has enabled us to specifically develop our Quality in Beverages Scheme (QBS) for chemists and microbiologists.


Download >>

Quality in Microbiology Scheme

LGC Standards

The Quality in Microbiology Scheme (QMS) is intended for use by microbiologists working in the food, beverage, dairy, herbs and spice industries. Laboratories carrying out such microbiological testing need to be able to demonstrate that they are producing accurate and meaningful results. This can be done by conducting a comprehensive quality assurance programme, which includes regular participation in a suitable PT scheme.


Download >>

Quality in Meat and Fish Scheme

LGC Standards

The Quality in Meat and Fish Analysis Scheme (QMAS) is intended for use by chemists and microbiologists working in the meat, fish, shellfish processing industries. Legislation in the form of EU Regulation 882/2004 ‘Official Controls Performed to Ensure the Verification of Compliance with Feed and Food Law, Animal Health and Animal Welfare Rules requires official control laborites to be accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 and therefore to use external means of monitoring performance such as proficiency testing.


Download >>

MAPS - Malt Analytes Proficiency Scheme

LGC Standards

Malt is a complex product and forms a key ingredient in brewing and distilling. It is considered to be at the heart of the process, providing most of the sugars and complex carbohydrates which produce the alcohol and flavor of the final product. The MAPS scheme covers test materials from the full range of malting barley and barley used for brewing and distilling.


Download >>

Quality in Gelatine Scheme

LGC Standards

The Quality in Gelatine Scheme (QGS) has been developed in collaboration with the trade body, Gelatine Manufacturers of Europe (GME). GME members account for nearly half of the worldwide gelatine production and the key role of the GME is to ensure that gelatine is manufactured to a consistently high quality for the benefit of gelatine customers and consumers.


Download >>

Quality in Food Chemistry Scheme

LGC Standards

QFCS is specifically designed to promote the quality and comparability in the measurement of a range of analyses in food products. A wide mixture of tests in food matrices is available for laboratories that perform proximate and nutritional analysis, pesticides, vitamins, water activity, metals, aflatoxins and additives (preservatives, colours and sweetners).


Download >>

Environmental hygiene monitoring proficiency

LGC Standards

Regular hygiene monitoring of environmental surfaces and equipment, in manufacturing and healthcare, is a key part of any quality system. Ensuring control of microbial contamination can directly affect the quality of both products and patient care.


Download >>

Quality in Dairy Chemistry Scheme

LGC Standards

The Quality in Dairy Chemistry Scheme (QDCS) is one of the most comprehensive proficiency testing scheme available to laboratories performing compositional and safety analysis ion the dairy sector. Participation in QDCS can help give authority to the results produced by your laboratory.


Download >>

Quality in Chocolate Scheme

LGC Standards

The Quality in Chocolate Scheme (QCS) is intended for use by microbiologists and chemists working in the chocolate manufacturing industry. Chocolate products are also one of the few food commodities whose composition is controlled at EC level. For example, EC Directive 2000/36/EC ‘relating to cocoa and chocolate products intended for human consumption’, sets common rules and definitions with regard to the composition, manufacture, packaging and labeling of chocolate and cocoa products


Download >>

BAPS – Brewing Analytes Proficiency Scheme

LGC Standards

BAPS is jointly run by LGC Standards and Campden BRI promoting quality in the measurement of a range of chemical, microbiological and sensory analytes. For laboratories that preform the analysis of beer, participation in BAPS can provide confidence that results are meaningful and accurate which in turn, helps to ensure the quality of beet, and integrity of the brand.


Download >>

How detectable are metal and x-ray detectable plastics?

Boedeker Plastics, Inc.

This paper explores the level of detectability of metal & x-ray detectable plastics, which are commonly used to enhance food and product safety in food, beverage and pharmaceutical processing applications. This paper is intended for anyone using metal or x-ray detection equipment or looking to improve their foreign contamination detection process by utilizing detectable plastics with detection systems. Understanding the level of detectability of metal & x-ray detectable plastics will help ensure a successful implementation of detectable plastics and maximize food and product safety. Included are visual references and detectability charts for both metal & x-ray, showing size comparisons from tests run on industry leading detection equipment.


Download >>

Fighting Food Fraud

Bruker Optics

Maintaining brand reputation and product quality has led to increased focus on qualifying raw materials and ingredients used in food production. In addition to traditional quality parameters like moisture, fat, and protein, detection of adulterants plays a critical role in ensuring food safety and quality. The USP (US Pharmacopeial Convention) Food Fraud Database currently lists hundreds of incidents of economically motivated adulteration (EMA), substitution, counterfeiting or mislabeling of food products, such as olive oil and milk powder and some prominent adulterants e.g. melamine.


Download >>

Analysis of Fish Oil with FT-NIR Spectroscopy

Bruker Optics

Marine oils are the main source of polyunsaturated Omega-3 fatty acids. Especially EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid) and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid) are known to be highly beneficial to human health. Since the body is not able to produce Omega-3 fatty acids on its own, it is essential to supplement our diet with DHA, EPA and other valuable unsaturated fatty acids.


Download >>

FT-NIR Spectroscopy for the Sugar Industry

Bruker Optics

Producing sugar from sugar cane or beet is a process with multiple steps from the crop to the final product, like clarifying, crystallization and refining. Along the complete production chain a tight quality control is important to ensure optimized yield and quality. FT-NIR offers a fast and effective tool for controlling the critical QC parameters in all steps of processing cane, raw sugar, different types of juices, molasses, syrups and crystal sugar products. Even the products and by-products of the downstream production process, e.g. alcohols and bagasse, can be monitored.


Download >>

Iodine Value NIR Analysis

Bruker Optics

Iodine value (IV) is a measure of the total number of unsaturated double bonds present in fats and oils. It is generally expressed in terms of “number of grams of iodine that will react with the double bonds in 100 grams of fats or oils”. A high IV oil contains a greater number of double bonds than a low IV oil. Fats with high iodine value are usually soft or liquid and are less stable to oxidation.


Download >>

Identification of Yeast & Bacteria in Food Microbiology

Bruker Optics

Microorganisms are not only essential for the production of food like dairy products, bread, beer and wine but they play also a major role in modern industrial processes such as the fermentation of enzymes, pigments, antioxidants etc. and increase the digestibility and stability of food. However microorganisms can cause serious problems in the production process like spoilage or even poisoning. An effective microbial quality management is essential for the safety of the product. The reliable identification of microorganisms allows to optimize production processes and to track down sources of contaminations.


Download >>

FT-NIR Edible Oil Analysis

Bruker Optics

Rapid quality control for edible oils can be achieved by Bruker Optics’ dedicated FT-NIR spectrometers. The analysis is quick, cost-effective and safe to use, even for untrained staff.


Download >>

Quality Control of Meat Products and Sausages

Bruker Optics

Meat comes - like all natural materials - in a wide range of compositional properties. For the meat industry it is essential to know the composition of raw meat and other ingredients in order to adapt the recipes for a high quality production of sausages, salami or other types of meat products. In addition, the testing of the finished meat products before delivery to the end customer is a crucial step for consumer satisfaction.


Download >>

FT-NIR Quality Control of Marzipan

Bruker Optics

Solid materials are easy to investigate by NIR spectroscopy. With the integrating sphere, the sample is illuminated from underneath and the diffusely reflected light from the sample is collected and detected.


Download >>

TempTrak Design and Features Overview

Cooper Atkins

In today’s varied work environments, there is specified equipment that requires a reliable, accurate monitoring program. The demands of regulatory compliance and safety place the burden squarely on the shoulders of management to insure that proper temperature, humidity and environmental monitoring protocols are in place. While manual temperature management can be performed, the process is time-consuming, and can take precious resources away from other duties. A comprehensive wireless monitoring system offers options that are more efficient and accurate.


Download >>

TempTrak Server Specifications

Cooper Atkins

A technical white paper reviewing the server specifications for the TempTrak


Download >>

NotifEye Wireless IT Notes

Cooper Atkins

User notes for NotifEye Sensor system


Download >>

NotfEye Wireless and Sensors and Ethernet Gateway System

Cooper Atkins

User Manual for NotfEye Wireless and Sensors and Ethernet Gateway System


Download >>

The Critical Role of Enabling Technologies for Today’s Food Safety and Quality Operations

SafetyChain Software

Gain insights on how emerging food safety and quality technologies are bringing fundamental, critical changes to FSQA operations, enabling food & beverage companies to better manage risk and meet key performance indicators - while saving time, saving money, and creating operational efficiencies.


Download >>

Milk Authenticity- Organic vs. Non-organic

PerkinElmer

With increasing concerns over contaminants in milk, both intentionally and unintentionally added, a growing number of people are switching to organic milk. This case study shows that it is possible to measure hippuric acid levels in milk by DSA/TOF MS using a reference standard to ascertain relative concentrations.


Download >>

Use of NIR Spectroscopy and Adulterant Screen for the Detection of Common Milk Adulterants

PerkinElmer

The value of milk on the open market is linked to its protein content, and standard methods for protein analysis rely on a simple nitrogen assay, with the protein concentration inferred from the nitrogen content. Consequently, the addition of chemicals rich in nitrogen, such as urea, can artificially increase the apparent protein content and thus the price demanded. This application note demonstrates the detection of intentional and accidental adulterants in milk using NIR spectroscopy and Adulterant Screen.


Download >>

Augmenting Nutritional Testing of Milk Powder with Adulterant Screen

PerkinElmer

Milk powder is one of the most widely traded food commodities and is used in a huge array of food products, from infant formula to baked goods and confectionary. Unfortunately, dairy products are also a frequent target of food fraud. This application note explores how NIR Spectroscopy with Adulterant Screen can augment the nutritional testing of milk powder.


Download >>

Wandashan Relies on PerkinElmer to Ensure Safety of Infant Milk Powder

PerkinElmer

This case study explores the fruitful collaboration between Wandashan Dairy Company in northeast China and PerkinElmer that has immediately helped to enhance quality control for ingredient detection in infant formula.


Download >>

Guarding Against the Next Melamine

PerkinElmer

Learn how PerkinElmer’s DairyGuard Milk Powder Analyzer allows you to screen for known and unknown economic adulterants in milk powder, as well as performing the same fast measurements routinely used for protein, moisture, and fat monitoring.


Download >>

Milk Adulteration with Melamine — Screening, Testing and Real-Time Detection

PerkinElmer

The adulteration of protein-based food products with melamine is now a well-known issue. Five years ago, the increasing number of renal failures in dogs and cats alerted the authorities to a problem in the pet food supply chain. This white paper shows how screening, testing and real-time detection can be utilized to generate fast, regulatory-level results with minimal sample preparation for the detection of melamine in adulterated milk in the supply chain.


Download >>

Analysis of Pesticide Residue in Spinach using the AutoMate-Q40 an Automated QuEChERS Solution

Teledyne Tekmar

QuEChERS is a Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe extraction method that has been developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities. The rise in popularity of the QuEChERS technique and the increase in sample testing have driven the need for automation for this extraction technique.


Download >>

Determination of Pesticide Residue in Apple Juice Using the AutoMate-Q40

Teledyne Tekmar

QuEChERS is a Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe extraction method that has been developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities. While the original unbuffered method was developed for plant matrices, since 2003, two additional buffered methods were created and adapted to many additional matrices such as fruit juices. The rise in popularity of the QuEChERS technique and the increase in sample testing have driven the need for automation for this extraction technique. The AutoMate-Q40 streamlines the two part QuEChERS method from the liquid extraction to the cleanup step. The aim of this project is to evaluate the performance and versatility of the Automate-Q40. A LC-MS/MS was used to determine pesticide residues in fruit juices, particularly in apple juice. Pesticide residues were extracted from the apple juice by using the AutoMate-Q40. Quantification was based on matrix-matched calibration curves with the use of internal standard to ensure method accuracy. QC samples were evaluated at levels of 10, 50, 100 ng/g to ensure precision and accuracy of the AutoMate-Q40.


Download >>

Determination of Pesticide Residues in Honey, by an Automated QuEChERS Solution

Tyler Trent and Matthew Trass

Abstract The QuEChERS (Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe) sample extraction method was developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities. While originally QuEChERS had been developed for plant matrices, the technique has since been adapted for many additional matrices such as honey, as well as several other applications. With the rise in popularity of this extraction technique and due to the reliability of its multiresidue methods, it has driven the need for automation of the QuEChERS extraction to increase productivity and throughput. The AutoMate-Q40 streamlines the QuEChERS method by adding Acetonitrile (ACN) and buffering salts, shaking, mixing, centrifugating the sample, transferring to a dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) tube, measuring and delivering the extract. The aim of this project is to validate the extraction performance of the AutoMate-Q40 by monitoring neonicotinoids and other pesticides in honey. The target residues were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).  Introduction Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is an occurrence in which worker bees from the honey bee colony unexpectedly dis ...


Download >>

Using Quality Tools and Metrics for Comparison of Error Potential in Pathogen Testing Methods

Roka Bioscience

Companies in the food industry have made significant strides in increasing the quality and safety of the food supply. The Food Safety Magazine, April/May 2012 issue notes that quality is defined differently within the food industry based on the customer.  Whatever the definition used, the business of quality in the food industry must be proactive.  With this in mind, the article goes on to review two programs and tools used to address quality and manage risk.  These are the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) program and the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA). A remarkable amount of focus and energy has gone into developing comprehensive HACCP plans that mitigate and control risk in order to ensure high quality standards are met within the food industry.   The FMEA is now seen as an important analysis tool to be used in conjunction with the HACCP to ensure quality and brand protection. The FMEA is done to analyze the potential for error and define mitigation strategies where that risk is identified.  The importance of this tool and the need for diligent self-regulation in food testing laboratories is made more clear by an article published in the Journal of ...


Download >>

The Positive Impact of Behavioral Change on Food Safety and Productivity

Alchemy

About the Study: This study was designed and conducted by Robert Meyer to evaluate a methodology for sustainably changing the behaviors of front-line workers in the food industry. Mr. Meyer has more than 40 years of experience in the food industry. He has held a number of positions including food facility management and development of sustainable behavioral change and learning transfer models. Executive Summary Food and workplace safety is a top priority for the food industry and its regulatory agencies. While training meth­ods have improved safety compliance over the past decade, additional efforts and methodologies need to be applied, especially in light of recent product recalls, additional regulatory mandates and consumer concerns about the safety of their food supply. In addition to the focus on safety, companies seek continual improvements in produc­tivity through reduction of waste, spoilage and other production efficiencies in order to maintain a profitable business in light of a challenging economy. The purpose of this study was to determine if prescribed supervisory coaching coupled with effective training could drive employee performance among front-line food workers. ...


Download >>

An Assessment of Bacterial Load in Raw Milk using GreenLight® Technology

ABSTRACT The GreenLight® system was designed for applications across the food industry with further uses in environmental measurements. The core technology is a novel oxygen-depletion sensor that can detect very small changes in oxygen content making the system ideal for use in enumerating aerobic microbes. Here we describe a small comparative study conducted by Luxcel Biosciences, assessing correlation between the GreenLight system and standard plate count (SPC) for local raw milk. GreenLight demonstrated strong correlation to SPC with improvements in time-to-result, limit of detection and preparation costs over SPC. GreenLight has been AOAC and Microval certified for raw meats and poultry and further certifications in dairy products is ongoing. INTRODUCTION GreenLight Model 930 is designed to address the increasing demand for faster, simpler methods of determining bacterial load in food samples. The industry standard for TVC determination (ISO 4833:2003), also known as Standard Plate Count (SPC), is widely used but presents users with some very significant drawbacks. The method is both material and labor intensive, requiring the preparation and analysis of multiple agar plates pe ...


Download >>

Development and Testing of a Rapid Protocol for Environmental Swabs Using an Oxygen-Depletion Technology

Alan Traylor and Alex Liu, MOCON Inc., Minneapolis, MN USA and Alison Larsson Ph.D., MarketFresh Food Testing Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN USA

INTRODUCTION In food process facilities, it is common practice for equipment and surfaces to be tested for cleanliness by swabbing. Usually, the recovered microbial load from a swab is submitted for evaluation of the Aerobic Plate Count (APC), also known as Total Viable Count (TVC). The reference methods for enumerating APC (TVC) include the BAM method and ISO 4833:2003. Both of these methods require preparation, dilution and plating on agar, resulting in a high degree of manual labor and long periods of incubation up to 72 hours. A new technology has been introduced that can reduce testing time and expense for very low bacterial loads on swabs, hence highlighting areas of concern for QC staff and hygienists. GreenLight® is an assay that can relate oxygen depletion to microbial load. In theory even the presence of one bacterium is detectable. By using a commercially available swab product as part of a standard swabbing protocol, GreenLight can replace the reference enumeration method, potentially giving results in less than 12 hours in comparison to the ISO method that takes 72 hours. In a four phase program, commercially available swab products were used to determine the expect ...


Download >>

GreenLight™ 960: Same-Day Analysis of Aerobic Plate Counts (APCs,TVCs) in Raw Meat Samples

Luxcel Biosciences Ltd., Cork, Ireland

Introduction An increasing appreciation for the importance of food and microbiological safety has resulted in a demand for a more rapid, high-throughput method for total viable count (TVC) quantification to deal with the increasing numbers of samples that require testing. The industry standard for TVC determination (ISO.4833.2003), also known as aerobic plate count, is widely used but presents users with some very significant drawbacks. The method is both materials and labour intensive, requiring the preparation and analysis of multiple agar plates per sample. More importantly, the method is slow, with 48-72 hours typically required for a definitive result [1-3]. Luxcel Biosciences has addressed these limitations with the development of the GreenLight™ 960 ; a microtitre-plate based assay which provides a rapid high-throughput method for the assessment of aerobic bacterial load through analysis of microbial oxygen consumption [4,5]. When applied to the determination of Total Aerobic Viable Counts in raw meat (Beef samples) results are generated in 1-12 hours depending on microbial load. The straight forward mix measure procedure allows rapid detection of microbial oxygen consumpti ...


Download >>

Reducing Contamination Risks of Compressed Air in Food Plants: Benchmarking Good Manufacturing Practices

Lee Scott, Parker Hannifin Corp.

A GMP Template for Food Plants Using Risk-based Systems: HACCP Procedures GFSI - SQF Code Objective The objective of this technical paper is to benchmark published Good Manufacturing Practices as they relate to compressed air use in a food processing facility in both a HACCP and/or Global Food Safety Initiative (SQF or BRC) environment. Introduction Any modern food manufacturing facility employs the use of compressed air extensively in the plant. As common as this is, the potential hazards associated with this powerful utility are not obvious and apparent. Food hygiene legislation to protect the consumer places the duty of care on the food manufacturer. For this reason, many companies often devise their own internal air quality standards based upon what they think or have been told is ‘best practice.’ This is no wonder, as the published collections of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) that relate to compressed air are nebulous and difficult to wade through. Understandably this has led to a significant difference in the quality of compressed air used throughout the industry, with major differences even existing in plants owned by the same company. The goal of this paper is to h ...


Download >>

Analysis of Coalescing Efficiency in Replacement Filter Elements

Allan Fish Product Manager – Filtration, Parker Hannifin Corp.

Introduction High efficiency coalescing filters are often specified when there is a need to protect sensitive equipment that is operated by compressed air. A high efficiency coalescing filter can tame the effects of oil, water, and particulates that are present in virtually all compressed air supply lines. A high quality coalescing filter element will typically have a rated filtration efficiency of somewhere 95% and 99.999+%. The required level of filtration efficiency is dependent upon the quality of the compressed air in the supply line, and the sensitivity of the equipment or process that is connected to the line. For example, when compressed air is used to propel paint to the surface of an automobile body, it is imperative that the compressed air be as pure as possible in order to avoid defects in the painted surface. Therefore, coalescing filters with very high efficiencies are often specified for critical applications. Replacement Element Performance Comparison Recently, a customer asked about the use of “non-branded” replacement filter elements, purchased from a retailer over the internet, to replace a coalescing filter element in a Parker Balston brand filter housing. Acc ...


Download >>

US Food Safety Modernization Act: Overview and Impact for Importers and Exporters

Eurofins and Leavitt Partners

Introduction: In the United States, lawmakers, regulators, consumers and the media are more focused on food safety than ever before. On January 4, 2011, President Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act into law, which represents the largest change of the food safety system since the passage for the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act in 1938. The new legislation will bring significant changes to an already shifting food safety landscape, especially in the area of imported foods and ingredients. This paper will outline (1) the current food safety landscape that has impact on the way in which food imports are perceived in the U.S., (2) an overview of the key provisions of the new legislation of importance to importers and exporters, (3) additional considerations, and opportunities. (1) Food Safety Landscape Changing consumption patterns, large outbreaks of foodborne illness, new food safety science, and identification of new risks all contribute to the shifting food safety system. Consumer demand for fresh food year-round requires global sourcing of fresh food and ingredients. Currently, imports account for 15 percent of the U.S. food supply, including over 75 percent of s ...


Download >>

Top 10 Considerations for Building a Robust Food Safety Management System

Vel Pillay, Manager Food Safety Programs – LRQA Americas

Old Habits Die Hard There is still a belief amongst some managers in the food industry that an organization only needs a robust HACCP program to control food-borne hazards and manage risks, and that the HACCP program owner is the Quality Assurance (QA) department. Casting our minds back 10 years ago, food safety professionals (who were commonly referred to as ‘HACCP coordinators’) remember the days when the HACCP program was a QA department initiative with support, but no commitment, from division managers, and when communication of management of change was on a need-to-know basis. Instances where procurement made deals with new suppliers and where engineering worked with production to acquire and install new equipment without involving the QA department were not uncommon. I recall a situation where increased capacity was required because of a promotion launched by marketing. The production and engineering divisions installed an additional cooking kettle to the current Clean-In-Place (CIP) system. The flow rate during cleaning was not taken into account, and validation of the system was not performed as a result of excluding QA from the team. The result was inadequate cleaning whi ...


Download >>

Compressed Air: An Overlooked Source of Contamination in the Food Industry

Allan Fish, Parker Hannifin Corporation and Peter Froehlich, Peak Media

Compressed air is used in a broad range of applications in the food processing industry such as mixing of ingredients, cutting, sparging, drying of product, transporting/propelling product through processing systems and packaging of final product. In many of these applications, compressed air is in direct contact or indirect contact with food product and the impurities in the compressed air may contaminate the food product which can result in change of color and taste, reduced shelf life, in addition to exposure to bacteria and other microorganisms can result in product recalls. Compressed air, which is generated on site by pulling in ambient air and compressing it, contains water vapor, particulate matter (atmospheric air typically contains 140-150 million dirt particles/m3)1 oil vapor and droplets and microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and spores (atmospheric air can contain up to 100 million microorganisms/m3)2 In addition, compressed air will also contain liquid oil, oil aerosols and oil vapor which leak in through worn seals, orifices and o-rings within the compressor. Since the compression process raises the temperature of the air, the air is then cooled before u ...


Download >>

Safer Food Supply Chains
A Revolution in Food Safety Assessments

Vel Pillay, Food Safety Program Manager – Americas, LRQA; and Cor Groenveld Global Food Product Manager of LRQA and chairman of the Foundation for Food Safety Certification.

A revolution in the way the food manufacturing sector is regulated and assessed is ushering in a new era of food safety A whole new approach to risk management and quality assurance is contained within FSSC 22000. Gone are the days of the tick box approach, and the single snapshot in time. Under FSSC 22000, the whole network of interacting processes will be assessed and monitored. In this article, we look at how this will change the food manufacturing sector, and how it will benefit all concerned. This process-based approach does not just mean safer food for consumers; it will also lead to: business and performance improvements reduced risk better protection for corporate reputations lower costs Consumers are increasingly concerned about the safety of their food supply They're looking at what they eat and asking searching questions. They want reassurance. They are alarmed at some of the mistakes that have been made, and confidence in the integrity of food supplies is at an all time low. According to an IBM Consumer Confidence Survey, 80% of consumers do not trust their food. Not surprisingly, the large retailers and manufacturers are listening to their customers and startin ...


Download >>

Committing to a Food Safety Culture
Educating Employees and Transforming the Individual

Vel Pillay, Food Safety Program Manager - Americas, LRQA

Introduction: The Unconfident Reality Safe food is front and center of everyone’s mind. Consumers want reassurance, organizations are worried about brand reputation and shareholder value, and governments lack sufficient resources to thoroughly inspect every morsel of the food supply chain. Subsequently, the media ensures that every incident and outbreak is reported as front page news. The industry has come a long way in its practices to ensure that the supply of food is safe, and organizations like the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) have been instrumental in promulgating and benchmarking food safety programs to ensure consistent application. However, E.Coli and salmonella have become common household words, and the number of food recalls continues to grow year-on-year. More needs to be done to gain confidence and trust in the supply chain. This article looks at how a culture-based approach to educating and training employees will help change this landscape. Transforming good people Let’s not recreate the wheel. Leading quality expert and author Edward Deming helped revolutionize the way businesses operate around the world, and there are key components of his teachings that ca ...


Download >>

Environmental Monitoring Guide

Eurofins

What is the Goal? Primary: to find pathogens in the environment before they contaminate product Secondary: to find spoilage microorganisms in the environment before they affect product Tertiary: to assess effectiveness of cleaning, sanitation, and employee hygiene practices How do you Achieve Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes Control? Thorough cleaning and sanitation Traffic control - personnel and equipment Separation of raw and pasteurized product Air and dust control Water control Where to Test? A well designed Environmental Monitoring Program will include samples from various areas throughout your production process. The simplest way to organize your sampling program is through the use of zones as outlined below. Multiple sampling sites from each zone should be determined before you begin taking samples based on your specific facility design and processes. If the final number of sampling sites in a zone exceeds the recommended amount of samples, you can rotate sites at each sampling interval to increase coverage in a particular zone. For example, if you have identified 60 potential sampling sites in Zone 2, randomly select 10-15 sites each week, mak ...


Download >>

Food Safety, From Farm to Fork:
A Best Practice Approach to Implementing a Food Safety Management System

EtQ

Now, more than ever, all food chain stakeholders are required to demonstrate their commitment to food safety and quality. Recent food-related events have led regulatory bodies like the FDA to examine not only their internal processes but to also set forth standards and initiatives to increase regulation and oversight of the food production supply chain. Major food retailers are now requiring that their suppliers adhere to the Safe Quality Food (SQF) initiative, as well as other food safety regulations such as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP), and ISO 22000. This is due to the increase in safety regulations in the food and beverage industry which has resulted in a higher demand for suppliers to demonstrate that they have incorporated safety and quality initiatives into their food production processes. An increasing number of major food retailers will only accept products from suppliers who can demonstrate these food safety and quality principles. The leading methods for demonstrating safety and quality in the food chain are to implement HACCP, ISO 22000 and SQF food safety processes into a Food Safety Management System (FSMS). HACCP involves identifying hazards withi ...


Download >>

Food Safety Magazine
Featured Products

SYNAPT G2-Si High Definition Mass Spectrometry

Redefining Resolution - Resolution in 3 Dimensions Information. Informatics. Impact. SYNAPT provide …

Read more >>


Colitag P/A Water Test Kit for E.coli

The Colitag P/A Water Test Kit uses an EPA-approved selective and differential medium to detect tota …

Read more >>


Metal and X-Ray Detectable Plastics and Parts

FDA Compliant Metal and X-Ray Detectable Plastic Parts, Plastic Sheet, Rod and Tube Description Boe …

Read more >>


News

Neogen Earns AOAC Approval for AccuPoint® Advanced

Neogen Corporation has received approval from the AOAC Research Institute for its rapid and accurate AccuPoint® Advanced ATP Sanitation Monitoring System.

Read more >>


AIB International Offers Food Labeling Compliance Just in Time for FSMA Deadlines

AIB International’s global team of FSMA experts is ready to assist with bringing your food safety program into compliance with the many changes mandated by the FDA.

Read more >>


LRQA to Offer FDA-Recognized FSMA Preventive Controls Qualified Individual for Human Food FSPCA Training

LRQA has announced an expansion of its food safety training courses. The company will now offer U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-recognized Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Preventive Controls Qualified Individual for Human Food Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA) training.

Read more >>


White Papers

SUPS - Sugar Proficiency Scheme

SUPS is suitable for laboratories who analyse sugar and other natural sweetners, particularly man ...

Read more >>


Soft Drinks and Fruit Juices proficiency scheme

Over the years LGC has gained extensive understanding of the soft drinks and fruit juice industri ...

Read more >>


Quality in Microbiology Scheme

The Quality in Microbiology Scheme (QMS) is intended for use by microbiologists working in the fo ...

Read more >>


Login Form

Forget your password?

Create Login

 
 
 
 

May we keep you up to date with other communications?

 

Concerned about your privacy?

Refine Your Search

Search in: